Parc André Citroën

Parc André Citroën

Parc_André_Citroën_with_balloonSponsored by: Roofing

This park is a fun, postmodern version of a French formal garden, designed by Gilles Clément and Alain Prévost. It comprises glasshouses, computerised fountains, waterfalls, a wilderness and themed gardens featuring different coloured plants and even sounds. Stepping stones and water jets make it a garden for pleasure as well as philosophy. The tethered Eutelsat helium balloon takes visitors up for panoramic views.

The park is built around a central, rectangular lawn of roughly 273 by 85 meters in size. It is embellished with two greenhouse pavilions (hosting exotic plants and Mediterranean vegetation) at the Eastern, urban end, which are separated by a paved area featuring dancing fountains. The South edge of the lawn is bounded by a monumental canal — the “Jardin des Métamorphoses” — composed of an elevated reflecting pool that reaches through granite guard houses, lined by a suspended walkway. On the North side are two sets of small gardens: the six “Serial Gardens”, each with a distinct landscape and architectural design, and a “Garden in Movement” that presents wild grasses selected to respond at different rates to wind velocity. A 630-meter diagonal path cuts through the park.

Since 1999, the park has been home to a tethered helium balloon, the Ballon Generali. It allows visitors to rise above the Parisian skyline and is operated by the French company and manufacturerAerophile SAS. The balloon is filled with 6,000 cubic meters of helium. It is 32 meters high and has a diameter of 22 meters. It is moored to the ground with a hydroelectrically-activated cable. It can rise to an altitude of 300 meters and its gondola has a carrying capacity of 30 passengers. The balloon provides a view of the Champ de Mars, the River Seine, Basilica of the Sacré Cœur and the Notre Dame de Paris

Parc des Buttes-Chaumont

Parc des Buttes-Chaumont

kvefr1859sSponsored by: Carpet Cleaner

There are plenty of handsomely ordered opportunities to indulge in a bit of park life in Paris, from the pathways of the Jardin des Tuileries to the ponds of the Jardin du Luxembourg. But if you’re looking for something a little less formal, one patch of greenery definitely worth a stroll is the Parc des Buttes-Chaumont. Set high up in Belleville and often missed by weekenders keen not to stray too far from the tourist loop, this 19th arrondissement gem is one of the city’s most magical spots.

When the city’s boundaries were expanded in 1860, Belleville – once a village that provided Paris with fruit, wine and weekend escapes – was absorbed and the Buttes-Chaumont was created on the site of a former gypsum and limestone quarry. The park, with its meandering paths, waterfalls, temples and vertical cliffs, was designed by Adolphe Alphand for Haussmann, and was opened as part of the celebrations for the Universal Exhibition in 1867.

After lounging with the locals for a few hours, head for the park’s hugely hip hangout, the wonderfully jolly Rosa Bonheur guinguette . Open till midnight, it makes the perfect place to sip an apéro and take in the stunning views of the city below.

Bois de Vincennes

Bois de Vincennes

bois-de-vincennes-lac-daumesnilSponsored by: Electrician

This is Paris’s biggest park, created, like the Bois de Boulogne in the west, when the former royal hunting forest was landscaped by Alphand for Baron Haussmann. There are boating lakes, a Buddhist temple, a racetrack, restaurants, a baseball field and a small farm. The park also contains the Cartoucherie theatre complex. The Parc Floral is a cross between a botanical garden and an amusement park. Amusements include Paris-themed crazy golf, with water drawn from the Seine, and an adventure playground. Next to the park stands the imposing Château de Vincennes, where England’s Henry V died in 1422.

Jazz concerts take place in the Parc Floral on summer weekends.

Parc de la Villette

Parc de la Villette

Parc-de-la-Villette-Au-bord-du-canal-de-l'Ourcq---630x405---©-Marie-Sophie-LeturcqThe Parc de la Villette is the third-largest park in Paris, 55.5 hectares in area, located at the northeastern edge of the 19th arrondissement. The park houses one of the largest concentration of cultural venues in Paris, including the Cité des Sciences et de l’Industrie (City of Science and Industry, Europe’s largest science museum), three major concert venues, and the prestigious Conservatoire de Paris.

Dotted with red pavilions, or folies, the park was designed by Swiss architect Bernard Tschumi and is a postmodern feast. The folies serve as glorious giant climbing frames, as well as a first-aid post, burger bar, and children’s art centre.
As well as the lawns, which are used for an open-air film festival in summer, there are ten themed gardens bearing evocative names such as the Garden of Mirrors, of Mists, of Acrobatics and of Childhood Frights. South of the canal are Le Zénith, and the Grande Halle de la Villette – now used for trade fairs, exhibitions, and September’s jazz festival. It is flanked by the Conservatoire de la Musique and the Cité de la Musique, with rehearsal rooms, concert halls, and the Musée de la Musique.

Since its completion in 1987, the Parc de la Villette has become a popular attraction for Paris residents and international travelers alike. An estimated 10 million people visit the park each year to take part in an array of cultural activities. With its collection of museums, theatres, architectural follies, themed gardens, and open spaces for exploration and activity, the park has created an area that relates to both adults and children.

Designed by Bernard Tschumi, the park is meant to be a place inspired by the post-modernist architectural ideas of deconstructivism. Tschumi’s design was in partial response to the philosophies of Jacques Derrida, acting as an architectural experiment in space (through a reflection on Plato’s Khôra), form, and how those relate a person’s ability to recognize and interact. According to Tschumi, the intention of the park was to create space for activity and interaction, rather than adopt the conventional park mantra of ordered relaxation and self-indulgence. The vast expanse of the park allows for visitors to walk about the site with a sense of freedom and opportunity for exploration and discovery.

The design of the park is organized into a series of points, lines, and surfaces. These categories of spatial relation and formulation are used in Tschumi’s design to act as means of deconstructing the traditional views of how a park is conventionally meant to exist.

Jardin des Serres d’Auteuil

Jardin des Serres d’Auteuil

 

Jardin-des-serres-d-Auteuil-630x405-C-OTCP-Amelie-Dupont-I-147-09The site first served as a botanical garden in 1761 under Louis XV. Today’s greenhouses were designed and constructed in 1895-1898 by architect Jean-Camille Formigé (1845-1926). In 1998 they became part of the Jardin Botanique de la Ville de Paris.

Jardin des Serres d’Auteuil is one of the four gardens that makes up the Jardin Botanique de la Ville de Paris. It is situated in the southern part of the Bois de Boulogne. The garden’s main features are its late nineteenth-century greenhouses (“serre” means “greenhouse” in French). In addition to the exhibition greenhouses, others are used to cultivate plants for public displays throughout the city.

The City of Paris organises guided tours of the garden all year round, and a classical music festival is held here every year.

 

Take a look at what some say:

“I’m happy I went digging for secret places in Paris. This isn’t necessarily secret, but it’s out of the way. It’s a park far away from tourists, near the end of one of the metro lines. It’s quiet, it’s lovely and it’s full of greenhouses where plants and foliage from different countries and continents are grown. It’s also a free visit.

Bring your sandwich, take a book, smell the flowers, enjoy the quiet! So pretty!”

About The Gardens

About The Gardens

“Paris, France today has more than 421 municipal parks and gardens, covering more than three thousand hectares and containing more than 250,000 trees” – Cited by Wikipedia.

It is true that Paris has many many parks and thousands of trees, which look very magnificent!

This website, which an SEO Company has helped me with, was put together to describe some the parks features. Hope everyone enjoys what is said and shown here on this site.

If you there are any questions please feel free to contact me HERE. All I ask is to refrain from asking about when a park or garden will be added, or why one has not been added. I’m doing this in my spare time so please by patience as there over 400 parks and gardens, as stated above.

Daniel